Always awsome J. Wood recap HERE, Luck of the Lost from March 7, 2007.
Excerpt below:
"So on to interpretation and over-interpretation: When Hurley’s dad David  takes off, he does so to the 1973 pop hit "Shambala" by Three Dog  Night.  There’s plenty to be read into that particular song; Shambala is  the mythical Buddhist utopia in Tibet, which recalls the other Eastern  Buddhist references in the narrative.  But the song was, melodically, a  near rip-off of B.W. Stevenson’s "My Maria" from the same year.  B.W.  Stevenson was a country singer who played the Austin club circuit, not a  big figure on the adult contemporary charts.  What this is, though, is  an example of mirror twinning; both songs were hits, one melodically  rhymes with the other, yet they are functionally different in content.   This is essentially how Hurley and David’s stories work in relation to  each other; David leaves Hurley when Hurley is trying to help his dad  and doesn’t return, and when David tries to help Hurley, Hurley leaves  (to Australia) and doesn’t return.  Their narratives, in that sense,  melodically rhyme.  This narrative rhyming is pushed when Hurley smacks  up a mopey Charlie, essentially telling him to "cowboy up" like Sawyer  did to Karl."
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Impressive, most impressive.

Always awsome J. Wood recap HERE, Luck of the Lost from March 7, 2007.

Excerpt below:

"So on to interpretation and over-interpretation: When Hurley’s dad David takes off, he does so to the 1973 pop hit "Shambala" by Three Dog Night. There’s plenty to be read into that particular song; Shambala is the mythical Buddhist utopia in Tibet, which recalls the other Eastern Buddhist references in the narrative. But the song was, melodically, a near rip-off of B.W. Stevenson’s "My Maria" from the same year. B.W. Stevenson was a country singer who played the Austin club circuit, not a big figure on the adult contemporary charts. What this is, though, is an example of mirror twinning; both songs were hits, one melodically rhymes with the other, yet they are functionally different in content. This is essentially how Hurley and David’s stories work in relation to each other; David leaves Hurley when Hurley is trying to help his dad and doesn’t return, and when David tries to help Hurley, Hurley leaves (to Australia) and doesn’t return. Their narratives, in that sense, melodically rhyme. This narrative rhyming is pushed when Hurley smacks up a mopey Charlie, essentially telling him to "cowboy up" like Sawyer did to Karl."

————

Impressive, most impressive.